Friday, February 21, 2014

Short Hiatus

Hi Guys,

I'm currently taking a short hiatus while I attend to the pressing matter of Uni. I'm also waiting on some blog development ideas to come through from my IT peeps and have a few assignments to get ahead of. Stay in contact with me via my instagram or twitter accounts! Blog ya later x

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

Food Trucks Essay, historical analysis, contemporary perspective and future possibilities

So I haven't been doing much blogging lately, as I've been terribly busy doing writing of a different kind. Academic essays, you are the bane of my existence. I'm not even sure WHY I decided to go back to uni, but I'm hoping the Masters of Food Studies will be all worth it in the end.

I'm sharing my latest essay as I actually had a really fun time researching (WATTTT!?) Food Trucks are cool. If you are so inclined and hungry, you can read this little essay about them. Beep Beep.


The restaurant business is a fickle one. In Australia, half of all new hospitality businesses fail within four years.[1] It’s no surprise then, that the global financial crisis caused chaos among food retailers and accordingly, owners and operators had to become more savvy if they wished to operate within the food scene. Temporary dining spaces presented a viable alternative and popular option for food sellers, especially those trying to break into the food industry. Pop up restaurants and underground supper clubs are two manifestations of these types of eating options that became quite well known during difficult financial times.
Perhaps though, one of the most well known and penetrating aspects of the temporary dining phenomenon are the uber popular food trucks that have become an interesting and enduring food movement of their own.
Food trucks in their earliest and most simple form date back to the mid-late 19th century and then reappear in various formats to eventually develop into the food trucks we know today.
Historically, food trucks were a very low key affair built out of necessity. The earliest version is widely acknowledged to be a ‘chuck wagon’ created in 1866 by Texas Cattleman Charles Goodnight. It was essentially a wagon turned mobile kitchen that allowed Goodnight to cater for cattlemen who were moving their stock across country on a journey taking months with very little food available.[2]
In other parts of the USA, similar wagons were being used for a variety of purposes including providing factory workers with cheap meals in areas that had no access to traditional eateries.[3]The American Diner is said to have been born when horse drawn wagons became obsolete and were retrofitted as food venues.[4]
In the 1970’s across USA and Australia ‘lunch trucks’ or ‘smoko vans’ came into existence and would visit industrial workers offering cheap and fast food during their breaks. “These industrial lunch trucks often made several short stops to serve factory workers on fixed daily routes.”[5] This style of truck still exists but wasn’t and still isn’t considered a particularly glamorous option. Accordingly were nicknamed ‘roach coaches’.
On Australian soil, mobile food vans were common place when Agricultural shows came to town and would often sell ‘show food’ before moving on. Show food consisted of items like dagwood dogs, hot chips, fairy floss, hot dogs and pies. These food items weren’t highly esteemed but obviously travelled easily and could be prepared with little fuss.
1970’s surf culture was the catalyst for ‘Mr Whippy’ ice cream vans that captivated children and were commonplace in Australian towns. Ice cream trucks usually sold frozen goods including water icy poles and many versions of soft serve ice creams.
The modern food truck is, of course, very different to previous versions. Characterised by the gourmet food they sell, their relationship with social media, branding, food angle and design, food trucks have shed their industrial ‘roach coach’ image and are now a fashionable choice for food lovers, hipsters, restaurant goers and food truck devotees.
In 2013 and there are almost 3 million food trucks in the USA, and the phenomenon has spread across the world.[6] In terms of the Australian food truck scene, there obviously isn’t the same amount of trucks or the proliferation of the trend, but Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and Sydney are all home to some very popular Australian food trucks. The ‘scene’ in Australia however, is still quite indie and not as widespread as in the USA, which is, predictably, where the food truck movement is believed to have been started.
“The contemporary food truck movement—hip vendors serving up gourmet comfort food for budget-conscious customers drawn in droves by Twitter feeds and Facebook updates—originated in 2008 on the streets of Los Angeles, where a truck called Kogi BBQ started serving Korean barbecue wrapped in corn tortillas. Its founder, Roy Choi, was named one of America’s best new chefs in 2010 by Food & Wine magazine, unprecedented for a food truck operator; and word of his delectable short rib tacos and indefatigable multi-hour lineups swept across North America. By the summer of 2011, the trend was so widespread that in pioneering cities like LA, established chain restaurants such as Sizzler were launching trucks of their own.”[7]
The whole concept of modern food trucks differentiates them significantly from their unfashionable predecessors. Although the goal of the trucks is to sell affordable, convenient fare they are also “decidedly anti fast food”[8] which has helped to boost the industry as a whole.
The trucks represent a new option for those wanting to try a version of street food, be it infrequently as a novelty, or more regularly as part of a dining pattern. The new generation of food trucks offer high quality meals at reasonably low prices. The food trucks are often owned and run by already accomplished chefs who were partial to serving food in a more underground fashion or those who simply needed a cost effective way to break into the food market without having access to large amounts of capital.[9]
Carey[10] attributes the rise of the food truck in the USA in part to the fact that the food truck model “represents creative, entry level capitalism at it’s finest.”[11] It symbolises the American dream with an attainable entry point and the possibility of providing a good income whilst being your own boss.
Additionally having a successful food truck means the opportunity for expansion into a traditional ‘bricks and mortar’ establishment, which has been the pathway that those with lucrative businesses have already taken and a dream path for many.
Food trucks, however, are not a business without risk. The buy in is relatively inexpensive and they can be a good ‘earner’ although margins are often slim and variables such as weather, council/county permits, vehicle maintenance and fierce competition can cause issues for truck owners.[12] On the whole though, the inexpensive, novel concept means that food trucks can be sustainable and a worthwhile financial proposition.
With this in mind, it’s easy to see how the food trucks experienced a ‘boom’ throughout the great financial crisis, have now become a movement and why the model is such a popular choice for chefs and entrepreneurs. Obviously, on the other side of the coin, there has to be serious buy in from consumers for their businesses to be viable.
There are a plethora of reasons that could be credited to the success of the food truck industry. Firstly, the novelty of being able to purchase street food out of a designer vehicle with an interesting name was initially thought to be an attraction. Whilst this was probably correct, the lasting popularity of the movement suggests that food trucks and their design are just one element, and they are much more than just a fad.
The food is touted as being innovative, creative and offers the opportunity to get involved with street food at a level that in the past, in a western nation, would rarely have been possible. The trucks have distinct personalities and importantly, give diners an experience. People are definitely excited to be able to try something fresh and different.
The fact that the food is often available outside is a weather permitting bonus, as is the casual nature of the interaction.[13] Often it’s an easy lunchtime option that means you are still getting delicious food, but more cheaply, without having to make reservations or endure long wait times once you have placed an order. It’s dynamic, interactive and interestingly given the mobile nature of the trucks, gives the purchasers the feeling that they are a part of a wider community and according to Wessel[14], gives consumers a sense of place. The truck being nomadic means convenience for some, but also means that the trucks have to have the capacity to quickly and easily let their followers know their whereabouts.
The trucks have been dubbed the ‘twittering trucks’ due to their extensive use of the platform twitter. In fact, prolific use of social media may be one of the reasons that this mobile food trend has been accessible to the masses and has been a way the trucks have been able to maintain and inform a loyal follower base.
Facebook and twitter have become valuable platforms for food truck owners as they are free and widespread, but the marketing and branding which go well beyond tweets and status updates have undoubtedly added to the success of food trucks as a brand.[15]
The physical presence of the vehicles is impressive. They are usually custom designed and heavily branded to ensure they look interesting, unique and importantly, cleaner and trendier than their 1970’s counterparts. Usually a truck has a speciality and this is reflected in the name and menu.[16]
Many food trucks have customer databases and interact with their customers in a way that makes them feel like a community. Having their own apps, crowdsourcing recipes, contests, attending festivals, reality tv shows and offering discounts for loyalty are all savvy marketing techniques that help those with nous stay ahead of the competitive field.[17]
One aspect of the food truck marketing that heavily contributes to the identity of a vehicle and has become a catalyst for discussion is the name of the truck. Many owners have given trucks names using clever plays on words or puns which add character. The dump truck, Pretty Thai for a White Guy, Hit ‘n’ Run, Burger She Wrote and Dogzilla are among some of the wittier names that have received acclaim.
Aside from marketing, obviously the largest part of the appeal of these trucks is the varied cuisine available. Roy Choi’s Korean Mex fusion was a great starting point that inspired creative gourmet cuisine, interesting choices and food that people wouldn’t usually get to try. Currently there is almost any cuisine or fusion one could imagine with food trucks choosing to specialise in the weird and the wacky, as well as the wildly popular including grilled cheese sandwiches, fugu fish, pulled pork, dim sum, Mexican, vegetarian, sustainable- and the list goes on.
Excitingly, westernised nations are using food trucks as an opportunity to develop their own native street food scene as has been commonplace in Latin American and Asia for centuries. Unpredictably, it’s some of the most standard of menu items that have been given a fresh twist proving to be the most popular. Grilled cheese sandwiches transformed in a ‘cheesy mac and rib’ roll or spicy pork belly tacos have the masses lining up.
Melbourne’s ‘Beatbox Kitchen’ has become Australia’s most popular truck selling homestyle fries and burgers. Eat Art Truck is another notable truck headed by chefs from two famous Australian restaurants Tetsuya’s and Quay. They have a progressive street food style, with an eclectic mix influenced by tasty BBQ flavours like their BBQ beef brisket with kim-chi slaw and Korean chilli.[18]
Food trucks have spread throughout the USA, although there are a small number of cities that have really embraced the concept and are home to a developed food truck culture. LA is undeniably a hub of truck activity. It’s often said to be the home of the food truck as it has the largest registered number of trucks in any American city.[19] In LA, they are progressively pushing boundaries in terms of cuisine and the nature of the city means that food trucks have gone beyond a sub culture into part of the LA street culture. It’s not unusual for a large number of trucks to gather in one central location or for food trucks in LA to be fighting over parking spots in popular areas. The trucks really are part of the street scape.
Portland, Oregon have also embraced the trend but in a very different, portlandesque way. There are approximately 600 trucks (or carts as they refer to them in Portland) in the city alone. The difference between the roving LA trucks is that in Portland, there are parking places in central areas that have become permanent homes to different pods of carts. In each pod, there are up to 15 or 20 carts that offer a range of cuisines. Unlike other cities, whom are often are constantly negotiating with unhappy truck owners due to archaic laws that don’t suit the movement, Travel Portland[20], have embraced the culture as it’s own and even market the pods as one of the ‘must visits’ of the city. There are guides that run street cart tours, and the way that Portland have included the street carts has resulted in great things for the city; becoming the recipients of several accolades including one particularly prestigious honour from broadcaster CNN who awarded Portland with the title of Best Street Food.[21] The food truck/cart scene is particularly entrenched within Portland and they demonstrate a successful model where city council and food truck owners work together to have a good outcome for all involved, including a positive way in which the food trucks will work with the city in the future.
One Australian city that is presently working with their food trucks is the city of Sydney. In November 2012, the city council launched a one year trial which facilitated licenses for ten food trucks to serve their quality fare to Sydneysiders.
Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore commented on the trend saying “Food trucks are a street-food sensation in other global cities like Los Angeles and New York, and Sydneysiders told us they want them here - the idea is gourmet-quality, affordable food in places where options have previously been limited, especially late at night”[22].
At this stage, Australia’s food truck scene is less developed and defined in comparison to the USA, but that’s not to say they aren’t making their own mark. The Aussie trucks, although significantly less in number, are just as well known for their creative design, online presence and delicious, high quality food.[23] Aussie food trucks have been particularly imaginative in the locations they stop at to sell their food to the masses. Shipping yards, docking bays, parks and even graveyards are ‘on the map’ as notable food truck stops.
Melbourne has a larger number of trucks and is considered the birthplace of the modern food truck in Australia. As with the American trucks, Aussie trucks have a number of apps that help buyers locate their presence.
As its still uncertain territory in Australia, the rules and regulations, as well as an understanding of how the trucks work in conjunction with the city are still being developed. This ‘red tape’ is going to be a significant issue when looking towards the future of food trucks in Australia. As our laws aren’t up to date enough to deal adequately with having a large number of trucks on the road, this could present a road block for potential food truck owners.[24]
“Food trucks have expanded rapidly in both numbers and popularity over the past few years, and many cities are finding themselves ill-equipped to deal with these vendors from a regulatory perspective…City ordinances related to mobile vending were largely written decades ago, with vendors such as ice cream trucks, hot dog carts and sidewalk peddlers in mind.”
If the food truck movement is going to go ahead in the American fashion, Australian regulation is going to have to quickly advance to allow food truck owners to legally and easily run their vehicles. There are instances in Chicago, as well as other American cities where no modern food trucks exist because the system is too heavily regulated and won’t allow collaboration with food truck owners.[25] This is a very real risk for Australian cities and towns, especially if existing regulation is updated and is unfavourable towards current food truck owner operators.
“Of course, there have been some notable roadblocks for these meals on wheels, especially in highly publicised crackdowns by some city councils on permits. Running into complaints from traditional bricks and mortar business owners, councils like Adelaide City Council revised down the number of permits they were handing out or in some cases completely revoked them. Many councils have also been slow on the uptake in creating these permits, which is why so many food trucks tend to congregate in the same suburbs of major cities.”[26]
As we’ve seen in America, and will possibly continue to see, there are other issues for the future of food trucks, especially when some have already predicted that the ‘fad’ has passed.[27] This, along with, in some areas, complete market saturation, uncooperative councils that make it difficult for operators by disallowing trucks parking privileges, contradictory regulations from neighbouring councils, rising fuel costs, fierce competition, the passing nature of some food trends and costs including commissary kitchens are just some of the many issues facing food truck owners worldwide which will definitely affect them into the future.
Even with these issues taken into consideration, it’s fascinating to see the predicted growth for the food truck industry within the States, which of course, is also a good indicator of what is to come on Australian soil. “With low overhead, quick service, and the flexibility to adapt to trends, food trucks are the fastest-growing dining industry in the United States. Over the past five years, the sector has grown an average 8.4 % a year. Food truck revenue, which last year reached $650 million, is expected to quadruple to $2.7 billion by 2017.”[28] Picken also notes that the research survey reports food trucks will generate a massive 3-4% of total restaurant revenue by 2017, and that 91% of respondents believe the food truck movement is not a passing phase.
 “Food trucks are great things for communities; they provide more ‘eyes on the street’ for public safety and compliment the surrounding brick-and-mortar businesses.”[29] They provide new sources of economic growth, opportunity for entrepreneurship, redevelopment opportunities, an interesting food scene and the possibility of a distinct community flavour.  If regulation in Australian cities decides to embrace the food truck movement as American cities Los Angeles and Portland have done, there is the potential to work towards achieving the massive predicted growth within the industry.
Food wise, food trucks have given people the opportunity to embrace a street food culture, to try exciting cuisine at an affordable price. Food trucks have tapped into the social media culture, created loyal followers and given people a sense of place and community. They have given people the option to get into a viable business at an accessible entry point cost. If the success and future of food trucks rests on the ability to keep the masses captivated with fresh, innovative and affordable cuisine then food trucks look set to become an exciting staple across the urban landscapes and food scenes for both the USA and Australia.




Bibliography
Caldwell, Alison. “Will tweet for food. The impact of twitter and New York City food trucks, online, offline, and inline.” Appetite [0195-6663] 2011 vol:56 iss:2 pg:522 -522
Carey, Scott. “Kerbside enthusiasm: food trucks have been the definitive culinary trend of the recession--and as their popularity grows, more and more are moving into bricks and mortar.” Business traveller.2013 pg:64
Dougherty, Geoff. “Chicago's Food Trucks: Wrapped in Red Tape” Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, Vol. 12, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 62-65, University of California Press, http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/GFC.2012.12.1.62 .Accessed: Nov 2013.
Featherstone, Tony. “Ability to fail quickly, an important skill.” The Sydney Morning Herald. http://www.smh.com.au/small-business/managing/blogs/the-venture/ability-to-fail-quickly-an-important-skill-20120806-23osz.html published June 2012, accessed Nov 2013.
Gold, Jonathan. “How America Became a Food Truck Nation” The Smithsonian Magazine. http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/How-America-Became-a-Food-Truck-Nation.html# published Mar 2012, accessed Nov 2013.
Greco. JoAnn. “Parks keep on truckin': food trucks offer more variety in park fare, but not without controversy. Parks and Recreation. 2011, vol:46 iss:12 pg:69
History 2, “Modern Marvels, History of Food Trucks.” History 2 channel. http://www.history.com/shows/modern-marvels/videos/history-of-food-trucks Published 2012, Accessed Nov 2013.
Ibrahim , Noelle. “The food truck phenomenon. A successful blend of pr and social media.”  USC Graduate School of Southern California, May 2011, http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/ref/collection/p15799coll127/id/462499 accessed 14th Nov 2013.
Min, Moe. “Where Did the Modern U.S. Food Truck Movement Really Start?” The Huffington Post. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/quora/where-did-the-modern-us-f_b_1829587.html published Aug 2013, accessed Nov 2013.
Nordin, Kendra. “Restaurants  reinvent the food truck.” The Christian Science Monitor. http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/2013/0824/Restaurants-reinvent-the-food-truck Published Aug2013, accessed Nov 2013.
Pickren, Emily. “Food trucks more than a passing fad for many cities.” Cities Speak Org. http://citiesspeak.org/2013/05/20/food-trucks-more-than-a-passing-fad-for-many-cities/ published May 2013, accessed Nov 2013.
Puvanenthiran, Bhakthi.  “Origin Stories: Where Did All These Food Trucks Come From?” Junkee,  25th October 2013, accessed 10th November 2013. http://junkee.com/origin-stories-following-the-food-trucks/21957
Smith, Daniel, P. “America’s top 20 food trucks.” QSR Magazine,  http://www.qsrmagazine.com/competition/america-s-top-20-food-trucks published Feb 2011, accessed Nov 2013.
Stein, Joel. “Gourmet on the Go. Good Food goes Trucking.” Time Magazine. http://archive.is/IWNNC published Mar 2010, accessed Nov 2013.
Turner, Chris. “When is a food truck more than a food truck?.” The Walrus. http://thewalrus.ca/more-than-a-food-truck/ published Nov 2012, accessed Nov 2013.
Wessel, Ginette. “From Place to NonPlace: A Case Study of Social Media and Contemporary Food Trucks” Journal of Urban Design, Vol. 17. No. 4, 511–531, November 2012.
Wright, Erin. “Food Trucks to be summers new eating craze.” News.com.au http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/food-trucks-to-be-summers-new-eating-craze/story-fneuz8zj-1226492719258 Oct, 2012. Accessed Nov 2013.



[1] Featherstone, Tony. “Ability to fail quickly, an important skill.” The Sydney Morning Herald. published June 2012, accessed Nov 2013.
[2] Ibrahim , Noelle. “The food truck phenomenon. A successful blend of pr and social media.”  USC Graduate School of Southern California, May 2011, accessed 14th Nov 2013
[3] Ibrahim , Noelle. “The food truck phenomenon. A successful blend of pr and social media.”  USC Graduate School of Southern California, May 2011, accessed 14th Nov 2013
[4] History 2, “Modern Marvels, History of Food Trucks.” History 2 channel. Published 2012, Accessed Nov 2013.
[5] Wessel, Ginette. “From Place to NonPlace: A Case Study of Social Media and Contemporary Food Trucks” Journal of Urban Design, Vol. 17. No. 4, 511–531, November 2012.
[6] History 2, “Modern Marvels, History of Food Trucks.” History 2 channel. Published 2012, Accessed Nov 2013.
[7] Turner, Chris. “When is a food truck more than a food truck?.” The Walrus. / published Nov 2012, accessed Nov 2013.
[8] Ibrahim , Noelle. “The food truck phenomenon. A successful blend of pr and social media.”  USC Graduate School of Southern California, May 2011, accessed 14th Nov 2013
[9] Ibrahim , Noelle. “The food truck phenomenon. A successful blend of pr and social media.”  USC Graduate School of Southern California, May 2011, accessed 14th Nov 2013
[10] Carey, Scott. “Kerbside enthusiasm: food trucks have been the definitive culinary trend of the recession--and as their popularity grows, more and more are moving into bricks and mortar.” Business traveller.2013 pg:64
[11] Carey, Scott. “Kerbside enthusiasm: food trucks have been the definitive culinary trend of the recession--and as their popularity grows, more and more are moving into bricks and mortar.” Business traveller.2013 pg:64
[12] Carey, Scott. “Kerbside enthusiasm: food trucks have been the definitive culinary trend of the recession--and as their popularity grows, more and more are moving into bricks and mortar.” Business traveller.2013 pg:64

[13] Wessel, Ginette. “From Place to NonPlace: A Case Study of Social Media and Contemporary Food Trucks” Journal of Urban Design, Vol. 17. No. 4, 511–531, November 2012.
[14] Wessel, Ginette. “From Place to NonPlace: A Case Study of Social Media and Contemporary Food Trucks” Journal of Urban Design, Vol. 17. No. 4, 511–531, November 2012.

[15] Caldwell, Alison. “Will tweet for food. The impact of twitter and New York City food trucks, online, offline, and inline.” Appetite [0195-6663] 2011 vol:56 iss:2 pg:522 -522
[16] Greco. JoAnn. “Parks keep on truckin': food trucks offer more variety in park fare, but not without controversy. Parks and Recreation. 2011, vol:46 iss:12 pg:69
[17] Caldwell, Alison. “Will tweet for food. The impact of twitter and New York City food trucks, online, offline, and inline.” Appetite [0195-6663] 2011 vol:56 iss:2 pg:522 -522

[18] Wright, Erin. “Food Trucks to be summers new eating craze.” News.com.au Oct, 2012. Accessed Nov 2013.
[19] Ibrahim , Noelle. “The food truck phenomenon. A successful blend of pr and social media.”  USC Graduate School of Southern California, May 2011, accessed 14th Nov 2013
[20] Stein, Joel. “Gourmet on the Go. Good Food goes Trucking.” Time Magazine. published Mar 2010, accessed Nov 2013.
[21] Stein, Joel. “Gourmet on the Go. Good Food goes Trucking.” Time Magazine. http://archive.is/IWNNC published Mar 2010, accessed Nov 2013.
[22] Wright, Erin. “Food Trucks to be summers new eating craze.” News.com.au Oct, 2012. Accessed Nov 2013.
[23] Puvanenthiran, Bhakthi.  “Origin Stories: Where Did All These Food Trucks Come From?” Junkee,  25th October 2013, accessed 10th November 2013
[24] Wright, Erin. “Food Trucks to be summers new eating craze.” News.com.au Oct, 2012. Accessed Nov 2013.
[25] Dougherty, Geoff. “Chicago's Food Trucks: Wrapped in Red Tape” Gastronomica: The Journal of Food and Culture, Vol. 12, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 62-65, University of California Press, 62 .Accessed: Nov 2013.
[26] Puvanenthiran, Bhakthi.  “Origin Stories: Where Did All These Food Trucks Come From?” Junkee,  25th October 2013, accessed 10th November 2013
[27] Stein, Joel. “Gourmet on the Go. Good Food goes Trucking.” Time Magazine. http://archive.is/IWNNC published Mar 2010, accessed Nov 2013.
[28] Stein, Joel. “Gourmet on the Go. Good Food goes Trucking.” Time Magazine. http://archive.is/IWNNC published Mar 2010, accessed Nov 2013.
[29] Pickren, Emily. “Food trucks more than a passing fad for many cities.” Cities Speak Org. published May 2013, accessed Nov 2013.

Monday, November 4, 2013

Part 1: Oregon - King Estate and Eugene

FLASHBACK Post: This time last year I was wandering across the USA in search of the best places to eat and stay. Here's a flashback post to the fabulous Portland which really did amaze me! Don't worry, there are plenty of new travels being updated soon! 
Happy reading and more importantly, happy eating x


As I found through my travels, people in the USA are pretty fond of their own neck of the woods. There’s a surplus of patriotism and a fair bit of, shall we call it… friendly rivalry between places. When inevitably asked where I’ve been and where I’m going to, there are the usual tut tuts, recommendations, and disaster stories told to me. There was however, a pretty unexpected response when I mentioned I was going to visit Oregon. Oregon, you say? What made you go there? I’ve heard Portland is amazing. I’ve never been, but I really want to go. So all these people across the US have heard of Portland, want to go, have never been and wondering what all the jazz is about?!

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Shock closure of Sardine Tin and Piaf, South Bank

Things have been a little quiet here at G.G. As I've said before, life sometimes gets in the way. I hope to rectify that soon and transform this space, but in the meantime bring you snippets of relevant news.

G.G. Readers will know that I had a bit of a love affair with Sardine Tin, a South Bank gem where I spent many happy hours, eating delicious morsels and sipping on the good stuff. It was one of the places that you could always go back to. I had a love/hate relationship with the ever changing menu, longing for some familiar deliciousness, but loving being forced to try new tasty things. 

I fondly remember the steak sandwich being one of the best I've ever had and trying desperately to recreate at home with lashings of butter.

Sadly, today it has been revealed that Sardine Tin and it's sister restaurant Piaf are closing as liquidators have been called. My condolences go out to the staff, and to Simon Livingston whom, in my opinion, is a pretty great restaurateur who has obviously and sadly fallen on hard times. I'm also offering condolences to my stomach and my sense of nostalgia, as I won't get to visit again.

It's been a tough week for Brisbane restaurants as Bistro One Eleven and Ortiga also ceasing trade. The restaurant scene in QLD is constantly evolving, but it's never warming to hear of closures of such loved premises especially under the circumstances. 

Thursday, July 25, 2013

Inspiration to get into the garden

I've been sitting in the garden but haven't been in the patch just yet. Alas, life is still getting in the way. We have had a few cold days.



Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Inspirational trees and other cute things


Tuesday, July 9, 2013

The patch is out.of.control.

It's fair to say that the vegie patch could be classified as a 'right royal mess' and is perhaps about to be declared as a natural disaster zone. The garlic plants are in and growing reasonably well, but... the weeds have started to slowly extend their sly tendrils and have populated, spreading, unchallenged by my usually keen hands, that would pluck them out and place them far away from the burgeoning shoots. Such is life sometimes.





Tuesday, July 2, 2013

Tea

Little known fact: My birthday is on the same day as the Boston Tea Party, only the Boston Tea Party is a few years older than me.... Does that account for my love of tea and rebellion? Perhaps.

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

The Food Manifesto

Saturday, June 8, 2013

Donut Star Signs?

Source: visual.ly via Susan on Pinterest
 
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